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Yo how do you play this?

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Yo how do you play this?

Postby TheRach » 30 Aug 2004, 12:20

This is Glenn Gould's Rondo Alla Turka. At the top of the last page (the Coda) there are rolled A major triad 2nd inversion chords. Glenn Gould plays them very nicely. I've been trying ever since I first heard his rendition (yeah for about a year or two) but I could never figure out how he plays them. Could anyone help me?
Here's the recording. I suggest you listen to the entire piece, actually, it's quite beautiful the way he plays.
Someone better reply cuz I had to rip it off my CD and convert it into .wav then use MusicMatch to convert it to .mp3.
http://therach.chopinmusic.net/GouldPla ... aTurka.mp3
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Postby Goldberg » 30 Aug 2004, 16:26

Well, I don't know because I haven't even tried yet, but what a beautiful recording! I am constantly wondering how and why people possibly can dislike Gould's Mozart. It's incredible!
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Postby An!ma` » 30 Aug 2004, 16:31

Didn't Gould dislike Mozart?


And this is one damn good rec:D. Thanks lol.

I'm not sure what exactly you mean, but Gould plays the upper not of the chord and then breaks the other 3 notes up to down. (if I'm hearing it right the chords is 4 notes) while holding the upper note. So if it were CEGC (for example), he plays CCEG.
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Postby Goldberg » 30 Aug 2004, 16:53

No, Gould didn't really hate Mozart (though he did dislike the late sonatas). He just had a natural tendency to avoid Mozart because his mother, from an early age, continually denied all claims that he was a "Mozartean prodigy", because Mozart was associated with being an epitome of over-explotation of genius at an early age, resulting in a horrible life. His mother wanted to avoid this kind of exploitation and association with Mozart, so Gould always remained wary of the composer later on in life. But, he admitted that Mozart was sort of a "guilty pleasure" of his and enjoyed playing all of his sonatas--even the latter ones--if only because the fingerwork was incredibly fun to play. There were some that he absolutely adored, though. But I think his relationship to Mozart was hardly different than the one he had to Beethoven. Some complain that Gould altered the score too much, but similar changes can be seen in many other recordings as well, even the WTC.

Mozart wasn't his favourite composer (that was reserved for Gibbons and Byrd, interestingly) but I do believe he mostly liked his music.
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Postby An!ma` » 30 Aug 2004, 17:02

Aaaah, thanks for (finally) clearing that up, I've heard so many diffirent opinions about Gould and Mozart, some saying that he hated him, so saying something completely diffirent. Thanks! 8)
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Postby TheRach » 30 Aug 2004, 17:13

Yeah I've tried the CCEG, but for some reason it doesn't work. That's how it's notated, actually. But it never sounds the same as Glenn Gould plays it.
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Postby citrine_peridot » 30 Aug 2004, 18:11

well, as far as what i heard,
it's quite a carefree recording(it make me has that kind of feeling like when i heard the chop22), the pace is kinda slow like most of his recording, (no wonder the files is so big.) it's kind of interesting that he recorded it since i read a book which says that he refused to learn the sonata331 when he was 12.
i think i will just come back later when in got the whole thing.( the dial-up is damn slow)
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Postby citrine_peridot » 30 Aug 2004, 18:48

for the in the first bar of the coda, GG play the brocken chord like, higher-C# ,C# ,E ,A, then in the repeat, he change it a little bit by playing higherC#,C#, E A then back to the high C#, (the chords with 4or 5 notes are having the same time value)~~~~~~~~~~~that is what i heard .

i wish its not too complicated for a 5 y old
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Postby TheRach » 30 Aug 2004, 18:51

It's not that complicated. I know that's what it sounds like, but C#, C#, E, A, but when you try to do it on the piano, and make it sound like he does it, it's difficult, and I always wonder if I'm playing it correctly. He does it so powerfully, you know...
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Postby Brewtality » 30 Aug 2004, 19:17

Goldberg wrote:No, Gould didn't really hate Mozart (though he did dislike the late sonatas). He just had a natural tendency to avoid Mozart because his mother, from an early age, continually denied all claims that he was a "Mozartean prodigy", because Mozart was associated with being an epitome of over-explotation of genius at an early age, resulting in a horrible life. His mother wanted to avoid this kind of exploitation and association with Mozart, so Gould always remained wary of the composer later on in life. But, he admitted that Mozart was sort of a "guilty pleasure" of his and enjoyed playing all of his sonatas--even the latter ones--if only because the fingerwork was incredibly fun to play. There were some that he absolutely adored, though. But I think his relationship to Mozart was hardly different than the one he had to Beethoven. Some complain that Gould altered the score too much, but similar changes can be seen in many other recordings as well, even the WTC.

Mozart wasn't his favourite composer (that was reserved for Gibbons and Byrd, interestingly) but I do believe he mostly liked his music.


he said that mozart was a lousy composer (or words to that effect)
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Postby Goldberg » 30 Aug 2004, 19:54

Brewtality wrote:
Goldberg wrote:No, Gould didn't really hate Mozart (though he did dislike the late sonatas). He just had a natural tendency to avoid Mozart because his mother, from an early age, continually denied all claims that he was a "Mozartean prodigy", because Mozart was associated with being an epitome of over-explotation of genius at an early age, resulting in a horrible life. His mother wanted to avoid this kind of exploitation and association with Mozart, so Gould always remained wary of the composer later on in life. But, he admitted that Mozart was sort of a "guilty pleasure" of his and enjoyed playing all of his sonatas--even the latter ones--if only because the fingerwork was incredibly fun to play. There were some that he absolutely adored, though. But I think his relationship to Mozart was hardly different than the one he had to Beethoven. Some complain that Gould altered the score too much, but similar changes can be seen in many other recordings as well, even the WTC.

Mozart wasn't his favourite composer (that was reserved for Gibbons and Byrd, interestingly) but I do believe he mostly liked his music.


he said that mozart was a lousy composer (or words to that effect)


I believe he said that Mozart was a bad composer who died too late---btw, don't quote me on that exactly because I'm sure the wording is wrong, but it's something a little closer to what he actually said. He said this slightly in jest, but what he seriously meant was that he didn't like, as I said before, Mozart's later sonatas and pieces in general because they were becoming too Romantic and a little too "cliched" at a certain point. He really disliked all-out Romantic Heroism and, as a result, never really enjoyed late Beethoven (he recorded a lot of Beethoven, though, including some concerti, but delibrately toned down the Romanticism as much as possible). It would be foolish of him to say he disliked early and most middle-era Mozart, though, because that music correlates closely to Haydn's, which of course Gould loved.

He also made such comments because he always considered Mozart to be somewhat dangerous because of what his mother was like, and, I speculate, to stir up occassional controversy. But why would he record the complete sonata cycle of a "lousy composer"?
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Postby TheRach » 30 Aug 2004, 21:22

That's a good question. Maybe he tried to butcher them up, so that less people would like them... I've only heard him playing the first movement of the famous Sonata in C (K. 545) and Rondo Alla Turka (which I posted above), and I actually really like them.
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Postby Brewtality » 31 Aug 2004, 04:48

yeah im not sure why he recorded them because he said in an interview that he'd already professed his true feelings about Mozart when they were recorded, it may have been the record companies decision but thats just a guess.
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Postby An!ma` » 31 Aug 2004, 15:18

He said Mozart died too late rather than too soon.
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Postby PianistSk8er » 31 Aug 2004, 17:45

Well thank you for the rec! :)

Once again, another great Gould interpretation. ;)

As for the question.. I'm not really sure! :shock:

PS
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