Login or Register to hide advertisements

Learning a concerto

The art and science of piano performance and technique

Postby Nocturneguy » 07 Jul 2005, 23:58

Lol, I actually study keys charts, heh...oh and concerning legato, I practice it on chopin without the pedal, and bach and mozart...
Nocturneguy
Registered Musician
 
Posts: 379
Joined: 04 Sep 2004, 19:53

Postby tony » 08 Jul 2005, 00:01

well, that is good. :)
tony
Registered Musician
 
Posts: 368
Joined: 03 Apr 2005, 22:59
Location: Polska

Postby Nocturneguy » 08 Jul 2005, 00:03

it truly is helpful...
Nocturneguy
Registered Musician
 
Posts: 379
Joined: 04 Sep 2004, 19:53

Postby tony » 08 Jul 2005, 00:06

only thing that bothers me is peices without the pedal they are so choppy , and Iknow that it is to help but they sound so horrible to make them smooth! :roll:
tony
Registered Musician
 
Posts: 368
Joined: 03 Apr 2005, 22:59
Location: Polska

Postby Nocturneguy » 08 Jul 2005, 00:08

That's why u practice legato like that, I spend about half an hour on legato a day, it is very important to have a melting legato like Chopin's or Mozart's.
Nocturneguy
Registered Musician
 
Posts: 379
Joined: 04 Sep 2004, 19:53

Postby tony » 08 Jul 2005, 00:10

well,I guess your right no pain no gain! :P :lol:
tony
Registered Musician
 
Posts: 368
Joined: 03 Apr 2005, 22:59
Location: Polska

Postby Nocturneguy » 08 Jul 2005, 00:14

Yeah, and the Damper pedal should not be used as a crutch because a person cannot play legato. The damper pedal is for coloring and for really impossible pieces to legato without pedal like the Chopin Barcarolle...
Nocturneguy
Registered Musician
 
Posts: 379
Joined: 04 Sep 2004, 19:53

Postby tony » 08 Jul 2005, 00:19

so you yourself dont use it excessively?
tony
Registered Musician
 
Posts: 368
Joined: 03 Apr 2005, 22:59
Location: Polska

Postby Nocturneguy » 08 Jul 2005, 00:22

I never, NEVER, use it for bach or mozart, like it really should be, and I use it in chopin and debussy because of the coloring, but I do not really need it to make my playing sound good because I already have a good legato. Like I said, the damper pedal is for coloring, and together with the left pedal, it creates great effects...like chopin and horowitz said: Use the damper sparingly!
Nocturneguy
Registered Musician
 
Posts: 379
Joined: 04 Sep 2004, 19:53

Postby tony » 08 Jul 2005, 00:25

you use both the pedals at the same time it sounds good when you do that? :D
tony
Registered Musician
 
Posts: 368
Joined: 03 Apr 2005, 22:59
Location: Polska

Postby Nocturneguy » 08 Jul 2005, 00:26

Yea, I got to go man, talk to you later...
Nocturneguy
Registered Musician
 
Posts: 379
Joined: 04 Sep 2004, 19:53

Postby tony » 08 Jul 2005, 00:28

ok cya! 8)
tony
Registered Musician
 
Posts: 368
Joined: 03 Apr 2005, 22:59
Location: Polska

Postby lol_nl » 04 Feb 2006, 11:32

Any early Mozart concerto I think. Or a Bach. But I prefer more difficult pieces :), like Rach and Prok and Chopin
lol_nl
Registered Musician
 
Posts: 356
Joined: 02 Feb 2006, 12:15
Location: Ede, Netherlands

Postby PJF » 15 Jul 2006, 03:16

Nocturneguy wrote:Lol, I gotta play a concerto and I have been studying the piano for only 11 months...
+

Are you a bona-fide prodigy? If you happen to be a genius, with talent on par with Pollini or Horowitz, then go ahead and learn a concerto.

If, on the other hand, you are like 99.99% of beginning piano students, learning a concerto after less than one year of lessons would be preposterous!

I'll use myself as an example. I showed some qualities of a prodigy. Before I began lessons, I could play three pieces from the standard classical repertoire, Fur Elise (all of it) Moonlight Sonata (1st mvmnt.) and Chopin's "Raindrop Prelude". I wasn't taught how to do it, I just did it instinctively. Learning a concerto never entered my mind, I was too busy studying the nuts and bolts of music, so-to-speak.

I didn't play a concerto until after 8 years of studying the piano. There is so much repertoire, it makes much more sense to start at the simpler pieces and steadily work your way up to an easy concerto, Hayden would be a good place to start.

I don't usually resort to putdowns, but...if you're not a great genius prodigy, your piano teacher is either crazy, mean, ignorant or just plain stupid. Trying to play a concerto after only 11 months of lessons would be a tremendous distraction from all the information you should be digesting.


Are you fluent in scales, arpeggios, harmonic progression, cadence patterns, part writing, aural skills, theory, principles of technique,
music literature, composition and performance?

It would be far more productive to expand your knowledge base, early on.
Learning a technically challenging piece before you've acquired the knowledge to know how to learn such a piece is irrational and illogical.

If I was in your position, I'd look teacher square in the eye and say, "you're kidding, right?" if she continued to insist, I'd calmly stand up, shake her hand and politely excuse myself.

Now, the good news. You can learn concertos starting right now, all you have to do is listen to good recordings of them. Marvel at the sounds a master pianist conjures from his instrument. If you know a piece through listening, playing it will be so much easier.

Learn first in the mind. Acrobatics can come later.
Per Sapientiam Felicitas!

Pete
PJF
Registered Musician
 
Posts: 548
Joined: 08 Jul 2006, 02:18

Postby tony » 17 Jul 2006, 19:53

Ok Im on the cadenza part of the concerto in Grieg... Me teacher says i can write my own.. or i can play the one there??/ what do you gusy think? Im gonna play it ina competition so.. what do you think...?
tony
Registered Musician
 
Posts: 368
Joined: 03 Apr 2005, 22:59
Location: Polska

PreviousNext

Return to Piano Playing

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 1 guest

cron